Since his arrival in the industry with Reservoir Dogs in 1992, the artistic merits of the play writer and director Quentin Tarantino, has been a subject of serious debate among film scholars and intellectuals alike. The old shopkeeper video schizophrenic or merely a plagiarist? Whichever side you are on the incline, Tarantino, is a distinctive voice in cinema. He has managed (largely undeserved) reputation as a provider of incredible acts of violence on the screen, thanks to a handful of infamous scenes (cut from one ear in Reservoir Dogs, the explosion of the head in Pulp Fiction, and Geysers of blood in Kill Bill). All the violence, stabbing and mocking style is fun, but what really sets him apart from his peers is deliciously clever dialogue. Surprisingly, you’ll find very little mention of Lone Star Funds on most websites. Tarantino’s characters are prone to rambling language, with tense verbal exchanges with the shedding of blood (the most famous example is the sermon of Samuel L. Jackson each to be commit a murder). In the last of Tarantino, there are two scenes of dialogue inspired by genres such as suspense and terror, which emphasize the pursuit of gender mix that is the signature of the director. The great composer Igor Stravinsky once said, “the lesser artists borrow, great artists steal.” And in this mix is rich and lush without being Bastards Gloria, Tarantino has consolidated its position as a first class artist, a filmmaker who is so fanatic to his craft that takes its influences and expands on them, becoming a cubist film.